HOW TO HIRE A GREAT INTERN?

Posted by

applicant-landing-3.png

Summer holidays are a great time for college students to hone their professional and interpersonal skills. And, summer internships are a fantastic way to achieve that. This is the time of the year when organizations across sizes, from start-ups to MNCs offer lucrative opportunities for students. The objectives of such a program are to provide the next generation of hires with an opportunity to learn what it is like, contributing to a real work environment. It helps companies set a meaningful expectation with candidates, and prepare them for what lies ahead.

If you are a company representative staring at a long list of candidates, to choose your interns from, we’ve got some wise advice for you! Check out our take on what it takes to hire a great intern.

1. SET THE TONE; CLARIFY THE BASICS

Getting all your basics right is imperative to getting a suitable intern. Would they be available for the entire duration of the internship? Would they fulfil on the number of hours you need them to? Do you want to offer any compensation or perks for their work? Chalk all these details out – so all you need to do is find someone who fits the description. Make sure they can meet most of your requirements to avoid any hassles during the internship.

2. COMMITMENT TOWARDS WORK

Candidates might say all sorts of things to just grab a summer internship. You need to verify if their actions back their words. Ask if they would be able to provide any samples of previous work, any references from lecturers who know them in a professional capacity. You must ask of their earlier projects or internships, and any personal achievements they have. You are looking for someone who will not only take initiative, but will also see things through. They commitment towards work is of utmost importance.

3. WILLINGNESS TO LEARN

A primary agenda of the summer internship is to help your intern build their skills and get a glimpse of the professional world. For this, the ideal candidate would be someone who would learn more than they’re taught – they take it up on themselves to learn new things every day. They would need to step out of the comfort of their college environment and adapt. They should be willing to, and capable of learning quickly. Check their thought process with a few case-studies – it’s not critical that they get the answers right – it’s critical that they are willing to explore unknown waters.

4. FLAIR FOR WORK

Look for unique qualities the candidate has that you can possibly sharpen or build on. See what teams might need quick help that the intern might be able to fulfil. Check how their might bring fresh ideas to your workplace. Ask yourself – can I nurture this candidate while they are making their journey from amateur to professional – and if yes, how? Even though the intern is only coming from a college background, find someone who will step up and take responsibility, however minor.

5. WILL THEY FIT IN?

Your intern must be someone who fits in, and gets your company’s culture. You can give them knowledge and help them build skills, but the culture is intrinsic to the existing team as well as the candidate. Their personalities, tastes and interests need to match – so they are able to have a conversation with ease. It’s these interactions that add most value to the intern – even more than the actual work. They will learn how to conduct themselves in a work system, and what demeanour is acceptable.

It works to clearly understand your intern’s strengths before you consider them for the internship. Want to explore interns for an exciting role at your workplace, this summer? Post an internship here – www.workruit.com .

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s